female roommates lounging in common area | are you a good roommate quiz
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One way to find out what kind of roommate you are is to live with someone for a year, ask them to review your performance, and brace yourself for the verdict. Another way is to take this quiz. Many of these scenarios and responses are based on students’ confessions in CampusWell surveys. Choose the options you think are best to find out how you rank.

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What was the most interesting thing you read in this article?

Have you seen at least one thing on that you will apply to everyday life?
Have you seen at least one thing on that caused you to get involved, ask for help, utilize campus resources, or help a friend?
If you could change one thing about , what would it be?
Are there any other topics or angles you would like to see in , that we haven't covered?
First name: ?

Last name:

E-mail:

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chances to win?

Refer up to 3 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Email 1:

Email 2:

Email 3:



Have you seen at least one thing on that you will apply to everyday life?
Have you seen at least one thing on that caused you to get involved, ask for help, utilize campus resources, or help a friend?
Are there any other topics or angles you would like to see in , that we haven't covered?
First name: ?

Last name:

E-mail:

I do not reside in Nevada Or Hawaii:

Want to increase your chances to win?

Refer up to 3 of your friends and when each visits , you will receive an additional entry into the weekly drawing.

Please note: Unless your friend chooses to opt-in, they will never receive another email from after the initial referral email.

Email 1:

Email 2:

Email 3:



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Article sources

Shelley Hershner, MD, sleep specialist and assistant professor in neurology, University of Michigan.

Rhonda Richards-Smith, a relationship expert and psychotherapist, Los Angeles, California.

Xu, PhD, professor of psychology, Idaho State University.

Eliasson, A. H., Lettieri, C. J., & Eliasson, A. (2010). Early to bed, early to rise! Sleep habits and academic performance in college students. Sleep and Breathing, 14(1), 71–75. Retrieved from http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11325-009-0282-2

Engle-Friedman, M., Riela, S., Golan, R., Ventuneac, A. M., et al. (2003, May). The effect of sleep loss on next day effort. Journal of Sleep Research, 12(2), 113–124. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.13652869.2003.00351.x/abstract

Gooley, J. J., Chamberlain, K., Smith, K. A., Khalsa, S. B., et al. (2011, March). Exposure to room light before bedtime suppresses melatonin onset and shortens melatonin duration in humans. Journal of Clinical Endocrinol Metabolism, 96(3), E463—E472. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3047226/

Hershner, S. D. & Chervin, R. D. (2014). Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students. Nature and Science of Sleep, 6, 73–84. Retrieved from http://www.dovepress.com/causes-and-consequences-of-sleepiness-among-collegestudents-peer-reviewed-article-NSS

Kelly, W. E., Kelly, K. E., & Clanton, R. C. (2001). The relationship between sleep length and grade point average among college students. Journal of College Student Development, 35, 84–86. Retrieved from http://a1.phobos.apple.com/us/r30/CobaltPublic/v4/4a/b9/97/4ab997e8-12b0-22d0-1120e54ea79c3d0e/215-4929907074434892796

King, K. A., Vidourek, R. A., English, L., & Merianos, A. L. (2014). Vigorous physical activity among college students: Using the health belief model to assess involvement and social support. Archives of Exercise Health and Disease, 4(2), 267–279.

National Sleep Foundation. (2011). Sleep in America: Technology use and sleep. Arlington, VA: National Sleep Foundation. Retrieved from http://sleepfoundation.org/sites/default/files/sleepinamericapoll/SIAP_2011_Summary_of_Findings.pdf

Plante, T. G., Coscarelli, L., & Ford, M. (2001). Does exercising with another enhance the stress-reducing benefits of exercise? International Journal of Stress Management, 8(3), 201–213.

Trockel, M. T., Barnes, M. D., & Egget, D. L. (2000). Health-related variables and academic performance among first-year college students: Implications for sleep and other behaviors. Journal of American College Health, 49, 125–131. Retrieved from 

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07448480009596294?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed&#.U82AgZRdVN4